Posted by: Kim Roberts | September 1, 2014

The Best (and Cheapest) Massage in Bangkok

A dear friend showed me this place years ago and I have been a fan ever since. You may know of the famous Wat Po massage school that trains many Thai massage therapists at their main school near the river. But fewer know about their satellite location in Sukhumvit–soi 39. Simple, clean, extremely efficient, the therapists are expert at their trade–I’ve never had a bad experience. Foot massage and “scrubbing” are on the ground floor, with upper levels reserved for full 1.5 or 2 hour Traditional Thai Massage. The rooms are pleasantly dark and airy, sparkly clean and calm. I have been known to book a taxi directly here from the airport on arrival in Bangkok. I can guarantee you will not walk out of here frazzled. The place is packed on Saturday afternoons, so book ahead.

Wat Po Massage Bangkok

Mon-Thu 09:00-24:30(L.O.22:30), Fri-Sun 10:30-01:00(L.O.23:00)

2 hour traditional Thai Massage: THB 300

1 hour foot Massage: THB 250

TEL: 02-261-0567

Posted by: Kim Roberts | August 12, 2014

Expect the Unexpected

You can never really count on things going the way you think they will, but here in Crestone, you can pretty much assume things will not go the way you think. After tending my garden for several weeks this summer, here’s what August weather can look like around here:

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It definitely keeps you on your toes!

Posted by: Kim Roberts | August 5, 2014

The Best Remedy I Know

Nature's Remedy

If ever the pace of life get’s you down, hurry up and take one of these…a walk in the wilderness. Nothing has the ability to renew my body and calm my mind and remind me of the preciousness of this human birth like a day in the mountains. Works every time.

Posted by: Kim Roberts | July 28, 2014

A View As Vast As Space

sand dunes

“Although my view is as vast as space, when comes to the nature of actions and their consequences, I am extremely precise, like little particles of flour.” (Or sand.)

~Guru Rinpoche

Posted by: Kim Roberts | July 22, 2014

The Real You–by Alan Watts

Watch this!

Posted by: Kim Roberts | July 15, 2014

Hillbilly Pilgrim

Found myself at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival last week. A foot-stompin, hoot-hollering, jig-dancing good time. Yeehaw! Nothing like great music and dancing for world peace.

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Posted by: Kim Roberts | July 8, 2014

On Becoming a Global Yogi

A while back, The Global Yogi interviewed me to ask how I found my way on the path to teaching yoga internationally.

Click here to read it on The Global Yogi.

 Be a global yogi

 

Are you ready to begin your path as a global yogi – teaching yoga internationally –  but don’t know where to start? Check out our new online course, How to Make a Fabulous Living Teaching, Traveling (and Saving) the World. Click here for details and to register.

Classes start 14 July 2014!

Posted by: Kim Roberts | June 16, 2014

Do You Have What it Takes to Be a Great Yoga Teacher?

So, you’ve done your teacher training. You learned how to lead a good yoga class. But what is the difference between leading a yoga class and inspiring your students? Take the quiz below to find out if you have what it takes to be a great yoga teacher.

1. Do you have a dedicated committed daily SELF-PRACTICE?

Taking classes is not the same as having your own practice. When you show up for yourself, whether or not anyone else is watching, your practice develops depth. People can see this. Great teachers have enough understanding of the tools of yoga to create and maintain their own practice that supports them through life’s ups and downs.

2. Do you have a great teacher?

It’s so important to have someone you can go to when you need guidance. You’ve learned the foundations of yoga practice with a wise and compassionate teacher who has devoted years to the practice, someone who has been there before you.

3. Do you have a meditation practice?

The Yoga Sutra names one asana, which is the most important one—that of sitting for meditation. Speaking of which…

4. Have you studied (or at least read) the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali?

And perhaps the Hatha Yoga Pradipika, Shiva Samhita, Bhagavad Gita, Upanishads)

Practice is important. So is study.

5. Have you addressed your own psychological garbage?

I cannot stress this enough. Obviously you don’t have to wait until you are completely neurosis-free (good luck with that!) but PLEASE, don’t burden your students or fellow teachers with unfinished psychological business. You are responsible for your own state of mind, but in this situation, as a yoga teacher, you are also responsible for guiding, protecting and expanding the state of mind of your student as well. It’s a big responsibility. Please take care.

6. Do you have healthy boundaries?

Do I need to say this? Please recognize the power differential and the position you hold as a yoga teacher. Don’t make a habit of sleeping with your students, and understand the difference between a student and a friend.

7. Can you accept where your students are?

Allowing is the first step to working with any habitual pattern. Can you have “bad” students without trying to change them? If you as a teacher cannot accept a student’s weakness, how do you expect them to? It’s about the student, not you.

8. Are you still (and always) a student?

If you always continue to be a student, you will retain what Suzuki Roshi called, Beginner’s Mind. “In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities; in the expert’s mind, there are few.” Keep evolving through regular intensive practice and study, retreats and continuing education.

9. Do you live what you teach?

Practice what you preach, not because it’s expected of you, or out of a sense of duty, but out of joy from experiencing the fruits of practice.

10. Do you share from your heart?

Trust your inner wisdom and experience to guide you.

11. Are you able to say “I don’t know?”

My first teacher Richard Freeman gave me great advice when I first started teaching. He said, “Teach from your heart and teach only what you know.” Words of wisdom that I still follow.

12. Can you accept other teachers and traditions?

Please don’t badmouth other styles of yoga, or other teachers; it’s just not good practice. We are all making our own way through this treacherous terrain called life, doing the best we can. If you have found a spiritual path that helps you, that is wonderful. Please respect my path as being valid, for me.

13. Can you laugh at yourself?

This may be the most important qualification to be a great teacher. Relax and enjoy! You’ve discovered a practice that you love enough to teach, and you get to help people at the same time! Lucky you! If you make a mistake, use it as material to prove to your students how yoga can make you a flexible, compassionate and wise human being.

 If you think you have what it takes to be a great yoga teacher, click here to join the upcoming webinar, How to Make a Fabulous Living Teaching, Traveling (and Saving) the World.

A 6 week Online Course designed to show you how to take your message and your teaching to new horizons, both inner and outer.

Click here to learn more.

 

NLF for MBG

Posted by: Kim Roberts | June 9, 2014

A visit with the 17th Karmapa

In March of this year, I went to Sarnath, India, where Shakyamuni Buddha gave teachings for the very first time. While I was there I had the incredible good fortune to have a private meeting with His Holiness the 17th Karmapa. _MG_2528 My meeting was limited to 3 minutes, so I had time for one question and one photo. In answer to my question, he essentially reminded me that the best way to  use this precious human birth is to practice taming the mind through meditation, and to use that training to develop compassion for all sentient beings.

Posted by: Kim Roberts | June 2, 2014

Luxury Pilgrims

Just finished our 3rd annual Contemplative Practice and Wellness Retreat in Phuket, and the incomparable Amanpuri Resort. We hosted a small group of graduate level psychology students in a training designed to share mindfulness practice for practical application in the clinical setting.

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It was a fabulous reminder that being a pilgrim, learning to train the mind and body to be present does NOT have to mean self-denial through  ascetic practices.

small amanpuri

Though we did practice yoga and meditation each day, and discussed ways to inspire compassion to arise in our hearts, we also ate fantastic Thai food, discovered the beautiful beaches Thailand is famous for.

amanpuri beach

We will repeat this program again in October 2014, so if you are interested to join send me a message in the form below, or click here for more information.   

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